Best Tile Saw

Best Tile saw

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Last Update: November, 2019

As the name suggests, a tile saw is used to cut tile. You might think that you’ll be buying a huge industrial-level machine, but these powerful saws are actually quite small. Don’t let the size fool you though. A tile saw will cut all types of tile straight or in angles.
While tile saws have a pretty straightforward purpose, which brand or model will really suit your needs? Take a look at our guide as you’re considering the best tile saw to get your job done.

Tile Saw

Summary

Tacklife Circular Saw

Tacklife Circular Saw

Use the Tacklife Circular Saw to make professional cuts without wearing yourself out. Ergonomic and strong: that’s all you could really ask for.

SKIL 3601-02

SKIL 3601-02

The SKIL has the power and the lightweight design that makes work easy. You’ll be able to cut through any tile without a problem once you get your hands on this.

Evolution DISCCUT

Evolution DISCCUT

If you’re looking for something easy to use yet still powerful, try out the Evolution. This strong little saw will fit easily in your hands while you work.

2.5 Horsepower Industrial Tile Saw

2.5 Horsepower Industrial Tile Saw

If you need a saw for industrial-level work, look no further. This tile saw boasts impressive horsepower to tackle your projects.

Makita 4100KB Dry Masonry Saw

Makita 4100KB Dry Masonry Saw

The Makita is made to cut through anything, but it’s the versatility that makes it special. Change the blades and adjust the angle to your liking.

Pros:

  • Cuts through materials easily
  • Strong and small, so anyone can use it
  • The ergonomic design makes it more comfortable to use

Cons:

  • Can be slightly awkward to use if you’re left-handed

More About The Tacklife Circular Saw

The Tacklife Circular Saw is designed to be powerful yet comfortable to use. The metal handle is meant to reduce your fatigue as you work with one hand, especially since it includes a stronger clamping force to make the cutting more stable.
To install it, all you have to do is rotate it. You won't need any tool to put this tile saw together. Don’t worry about cutting out the wrong shape either since you have a laser guide to ensure a professional and precise cutting line.
Use the 5.8Amp motor for the performance of a full-size motor with 3,500 rpm. Cut wood, plastic, plaster, and yes, tile. There are six blades in total, which can be switched out to help you cut different materials. Adjust the angle of your saw for the depth that you need.
The double protection switch will prevent the machine from accidentally opening so that you can continue cutting until your job is done.

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SKIL 3540-02

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PORTER CABLE-PCE980

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Makita 5007F

 Makita 5007F

Bosch Bare-Tool CCS180B

Bosch 10-Inch Worksite Table Saw

Pros:

  • Works quickly to cut through most materials
  • The original blade holds up well
  • Compact for easy storage

Cons:

  • It's not reversible and doesn't have enough clearance for wide boards

More About The SKIL 3601-02

The SKIL saw is a little bit larger than the Tacklife, but that doesn't make it any less useful. In fact, it can easily cut solid, engineered, and laminate flooring with ease. It can even make multiple types of cuts like a cross, miter, and rip cuts.
You don’t need to worry about the size making this saw too heavy either. It’s made to be lightweight so that you can take it with you anywhere, with different angles to help you adjust your cutting. With the die-cast aluminum miter and rip fence, your saw will remain strong no matter what you use it to cut through.

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SKIL 3540-02

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PORTER CABLE-PCE980

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Makita 5007F

 Makita 5007F

Bosch Bare-Tool CCS180B

Bosch 10-Inch Worksite Table Saw

Pros:

  • Great customer service if you happen to notice anything broken
  • Will cut through most items with ease
  • Cuts comparatively quickly

Cons:

  • The included blade is low quality and will need to be replaced upon purchase

More about the Evolution DISCCUT

The Evolution DISCCUT looks like any other saw, but it’s definitely made to cut tiles. This robust and versatile saw is made to cut even something like reinforced concrete without any problems at all.
You’ll stay safe when cutting, thanks to the soft grip of the handles, which are positioned precisely to help aid your cutting. Whether you’re cutting vertically or horizontally, this saw will help you get the job done.
This saw includes a 15Amp motor with no harmful fumes. It will have a 12-inch diamond blade that can cut up to 4 inches deep. Adjust the safety guard to the angle you need to use the saw safely. Make use of the spindle locking mechanism to replace the blade without worrying about too much maintenance.

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SKIL 3540-02

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Makita 5007F

 Makita 5007F

Bosch Bare-Tool CCS180B

Bosch 10-Inch Worksite Table Saw

Pros:

  • The sliding table is designed well to help you with your cuts
  • You won’t have to deal with too much overspray when you’re using the water
  • The set up of this saw is fairly easy

Cons:

  • The instructions are confusing, and the water pump may be a little weak

More About The 2.5 Hoursepower Industrial Tile Saw

This 2.5 Horsepower Industrial Tile Saw gives you industrial strength and power. You need to be strong enough just to lift it since it does weight about 100 pounds. It will work just like any other tile saw though, shooting water out to help keep your tile from cracking.
It's made of metal and is a corded electric type too. You don't have to deal with gas or any other additional components when you begin cutting.
Do keep in mind that nothing is included with this saw. There's no stand for it, but you might not mind this much once you take a look at the strong diamond blade to help you through all of your cuts.

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SKIL 3540-02

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PORTER CABLE-PCE980

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Makita 5007F

 Makita 5007F

Bosch Bare-Tool CCS180B

Bosch 10-Inch Worksite Table Saw

Pros:

  • Cuts through tile and porcelain with ease
  • It’s a compact option with great depth of cut
  • The guide bar system is great for guiding you through precise cuts.

Cons:

  • Doesn’t collect lots of dust, so you will need to sweep up the dust once you’re done (this is because it’s a dry saw)

More About The Makita 4100KB Dry Masonry Saw

You’ll have a powerful 13Amps when you pick up the Makita Dry Masonry Saw. It’s made to help you with high-quality cuts at 200 rpm, allowing you to use it even for more demanding situations.
You won’t get caught up when you’re cutting either. Thanks to the transparent upper guard dust cover, you can see everything that you’re doing. This way, you won’t have to worry about placing the saw in the wrong place.
Use it with diamond blades or with a stainless-steel option since this saw accepts different types of blades for more versatility. You’ll have even more versatility, thanks to the optional guide rail to help you with straight and accurate cutting. However, do keep in mind that this saw doesn’t have a wet option.

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SKIL 3540-02

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PORTER CABLE-PCE980

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Makita 5007F

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Bosch Bare-Tool CCS180B

Bosch 10-Inch Worksite Table Saw

How a Tile Saw Works

Tile saws are specifically made to be durable, helping you cut precisely and smoothly without damaging either the blade of the saw or the tiles themselves. You don’t need to use it to only cut tiles either. You can also cut ceramics, stone, bricks, porcelain, and other fragile materials. No matter you’re cutting, you’ll be using a spray of water feature.
This is easily one of the most important features of any of these saws. The water will prevent the blade from overheating, and also stop the tile from overheating and cracking. The wet tile will remain in one piece through the wet cutting process. The water will also capture most of the dust as well, keeping you and you saw that much cleaner.
You chosen saw will also have a diamond blade to help with the cutting process. The blade will be coated with diamonds that specifically help them grind through the tile. Unlike blades that cut through metal or wood, this one won't be sharp.
Beyond the blade and the water, which are characteristic of the tile saw, there are other features that make these saws stand out from one another.

Types of Tile Saws

Wet Tile Saws

There are two types of wet tile saws. These saws effectively table top saws that utilize water containment systems. The first utilizes a water pump and a water reservoir to recirculate clean water to the blade for clean cuts.

The second type attaches directly to a water faucet in which case the water is not recirculated. These saws are a must have for anyone who is completing major projects or will be working on a job site.

Tile Grinders

Tile saws are also referred to as angle grinders and are typically small handheld machines that can be used to cut tiles. These tile saws are typically lightweight and recommended for small to medium projects or specific needs related to trimming tile.

Masonry Saws

Masonry saws are handheld devices that are typically used for cutting countertops or creating curved tiles. They may be used with or without water and are also a solid choice for cutting ceramic tiles. These handheld saws are also recommended for small to medium projects.

Tile Nippers

Although not a saw, tile nippers are good for trimming tiles and clipping small pieces.

How to Choose the Right Tile Saw

Project Size and Size of Tiles

The right saw to pursue strongly depends on the size and scope of your project and how frequently you will be using it. If you are going to be regularly cutting tiles, and especially larger pieces of tile, you will want to go for a wet tile saw.

If you will be cutting large pieces of tile, wet saws are ideal as they have a max tile size range from 12-inches to 25-inches. The tabletop size will affect this as well.

If you are not going to be cutting tile regularly, or you are about to start a small to a medium do-it-yourself project, you cannot go wrong with either a tile grinder or masonry saw. Both options are handheld devices which means that they’re very portable and lightweight.

When you’re considering which of the handhelds to purchase, consider the material that you will be cutting. Think about whether or not that material will need water as part of the project.

Masonry saws come in wet or dry versions, and others have the ability to interchange between the two. If you need water, then you will need a masonry saw or a wet saw. On the other hand, if the water is not necessary, either a masonry saw or a tile grinder will do.

Finally, tile nippers are good for very small tasks and do-it-yourself repairs. They are also a handy tool to have for any project in which you need a more precise correction to a tile without having to pull out the larger tools.

However, tile nippers are not good for general cutting of tiles and large projects. Nonetheless, they are a nifty addition to your arsenal of tools.

Access to Water

Which type of wet saw to purchase should be determined by whether you will be close to a water source or not. If you will be on a job site, or in a location in which a faucet is not close by, then you will need to go with a saw that uses a reservoir.

The downside to this is that you will have to refill the reservoir due to loss of water through the cutting process. In this case, portability outweighs convenience. On the other hand, if the saw will primarily be stationary and have access to a faucet, going with the wet saw that directly connects may be a better option for you.

Weight

Wet saws can be heavy, but sturdy. These tabletop saws can weigh as little as ten pounds, to more than sixty, so consider the size and weight if you will be needing to transport it to job sites.

Grips and Dust

If your project requires a lot of cutting with materials that will generate a lot of dust, a wet saw is a necessity as this will minimize errors in your cutting or possible injuries. On the flipside, if your project requires only a minimal amount of cutting and correcting, a handheld saw with a comfortable grip may be just right for you. Having the right grip can also have a net impact on the outcome of your project.

Usage Tips

Type of Blade

Make sure that you’re using the correct kind of blade for the type of tile. There are diamond and steel blades, and most tile blades will be of the diamond variety. However, knowing the type and size of the blade will have an impact on the quality of your cut.

Safety First

Be sure to wear goggles and gloves. Goggles, especially as most tiles, spread a lot of dust into the air. This dust can significantly reduce visibility which can greatly increase the risk of a serious injury. Make sure that loose chords are not around your feet, or near water runoff, collection, or other areas.

Level Surface

Ensure that your saw is on a level plane and that it is on the sturdy footing. This means that if your table saw will be on a table, that it is a sturdy structure, especially if your saw is heavy. Likewise, you want to make sure that it’s level as this will affect your cuts, and minimize damage to your tiles and saw, but also prevent injuries.

Fill with Water

Ensure that your wet saw’s reservoir is full, or that your saw is appropriately and tightly attached to a water faucet. Saws that use a water pump and reservoir are filled in different ways as some have a removable trough, while others must be filled manually. For saws with water pumps, you want to be sure that you have fully submerged the water pump, or it may not work efficiently.

Position the Tile

Position your tile under the blade so that your pencil marking is directly under the blade. Make sure that the widest part of the tile is flush against the adjustable rip fence when you adjust it in order to minimize injuries. For bevel cuts, use a miter guide.

Ensure Water is Flowing

Once you turn the machine on, make sure that water is spraying onto the blade. Do this before cutting the tile in order to ensure accuracy and minimize injuries. Additionally, place a bucket under your table to help collect the water that will drain off of the table.

Feed the Tile

Once you’ve established safety protocols, and have ensured water and electricity are flowing, it’s time to push the tile through. Use a safety grip to do this to avoid injuries. Most importantly, do not force the tile through as this can damage the quality of the cut. Let the blade do its job at its own pace. Once it’s cut, turn the saw off and remove the tile.

Conclusion

Knowing which tile saw to purchase depends on the size and scope of your project. This in turn determines which type of saw you will need. For small projects, masonry and grinder saws are a solid choice, and if you are looking to be cost-effective, renting is a good option. For large and frequent projects, a wet saw is a must-have.

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